Garden Arch News, Reviews & Inspiration ... since 2010

How Are We Doing?

1 January 2017NEWS

Benefits of a Garden Arch

History of the Garden Arch

Gardeners have used the garden arch since Roman times. Their mosaics and artwork reveal that they adorned their arches and arbours with roses and vines. With their use of the garden arch, the Victorians were probably imitating the lychgate - a roofed gateway to a churchyard.

Arches and the Small Garden

A small space can benefit from a strategically placed garden arch that appears to "hint" that a whole new area is beyond, when in fact it may be very near the end of the garden. Choose a garden arch with more slender framework (metal arches are usually thinner than timber ones) or one painted green to blend in better.

Long Garden - Draw Attention to Your Arch

For longer gardens however, an arch can appear to shorten the garden so place with caution. You don't need worry so much about colour or chunky frames here - with more space you can afford to draw attention to your garden arch.

Rose Garden

The rose and the garden arch are perfectly matched but ensure that you use climber or rambler rose types to really bring out the best in your arch. Some roses to consider: "Blush Noisette" - light pink; "Cecile Brunner" - pink; "Dorothy Perkins" - light pink and "Felicite Perpetue" white. In addition, small flowered species will adapt more easily to the required shape of the archway.

Remember to "train" your roses on your garden arch. Tie them in and tidy regularly which will boost flowering and make for easier maintenance. In no time, your rose garden will be the envy of your neighbours! And if they want their own garden archway don't forget to tell them about this website to compare metal and wooden arches for gardens. Featuring archways from Gardman, Rowlinson and other leading manufacturers.